Huckleberry: No switchbacks, great views

Print Article

  • The Sprague Fire burns the flanks of Mount Brown as seen from the lookout.

  • 1

    The full length of the Sprague Fire was visible from the Lookout.

  • 2

    It was a good year for hucklberries in Glacier, despite the dry consitions, though the lower elevation berries are withering on the bushes.

  • The Sprague Fire burns the flanks of Mount Brown as seen from the lookout.

  • 1

    The full length of the Sprague Fire was visible from the Lookout.

  • 2

    It was a good year for hucklberries in Glacier, despite the dry consitions, though the lower elevation berries are withering on the bushes.

The Huckleberry Lookout in Glacier National Park is the only lookout trail in Glacier without a single switchback.

You start out going flat for a little ways and then slowly, but surely, start rising up through the Apgar Range. Six miles and about 3,000 feet later, youíre there.

It seems shorter than it really is. We suspect the gentle grade has something to do with it.

Views from the lookout are expansive ó you can see the Parkís west side from stem to stern.

We went up on Sunday to get a better look at the fires. They werenít really putting up much smoke, but one did get a sense of just how long the Sprague Fire is. Iím guessing around eight or nine miles.

The Adair Fire is also a bit more expansive from the lookout than it is from the ground. Itís a cool view, because you can see the old fire burns and the new fires burns laid out in front of you.

But fire watching aside, the lookout is best visited later in October, when the larch are turning.

The views, with the snow-capped peaks are truly memorable.

The trail, as its namesake implies, is rife with huckleberries. Most of the lower elevation berries were dried up by our brutally hot summer. But higher elevation berries, which benefited from a deep snowpack, were still rather plump.

Bears frequent this trail, so make sure you carry your bear spray. We heard one grumbling around in the slope below us.

A cool off-trail excursion is the ridge to the south of the lookout. If you follow it closely, you can cut the corner and then bushwhack down the slope to the trail below.

Make lots of noise, however. You never know when youíll run into a bruin.

Also of note is this trail has no water save for a creek that crosses in the first quarter mile. We lugged more than a gallon between the two of us to be sure we had enough.

Print Article

Read More Glacier Park

Citizen scientists log thousands of hours in Glacier Park

November 28, 2018 at 7:48 am | Hungry Horse News They roam the hills, traverse the passes, bust through brush and wait for hours on end in all sorts of bad weather. Theyíre Glacier National Parkís citizen scientists, a diverse band of ordinary folk...

Comments

Read More

Glacier visitation wonít break a record, but still near 3 million, despite fires

October 17, 2018 at 7:35 am | Hungry Horse News Visitation to Glacier National Park in September was up over the previous year, with 434,600 people coming to Glacier, an increase of 11.7 percent. Park visitation for the year is 2.833 million, whi...

Comments

Read More

California arstist shares unique view of Glacier

October 17, 2018 at 7:38 am | Lake County Leader For the month of October, California artist Jamie McHugh will be calling Glacier National Park home. As part of the Parkís Artist in Residence Program, McHugh will be exploring Glacierís natural bea...

Comments

Read More

Smith takes Texas parks post

October 17, 2018 at 7:36 am | Hungry Horse News Glacier National Parkís second in command has taken a new post in Texas, the Park Service announced last week. Deputy superintendent Eric Smith was named superintendent of Lake Meredith National Recr...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(406) 892-2151
PO BOX 189, 926 Nucleus Avenue
Columbia Falls, MT 59912

©2018 Hungry Horse News Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X